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Questions asked in NIACL Assistant Exam – 23/4/2017

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Dear Aspirants,

Quant and English questions asked in today’s NIACL Assistant Exam are listed below. If you have any more questions from the exam, then kindly share it in the comment section.

Number Series:

    1. 5, 6, 14, 45, 184, ?
    2. 7 ,  8,  18,  57,  232,  ?
    3. 9, 14, 21, 32, 49 ?
    4. 12, 6, 6, 9, ?
    5. 14,  37,  83,  152,  ?,  359
    6. 19, 24, 34, 51, 77, ?
    7. 13, 30, 64 , 115, ?, 268
    8. 16 , 8 , 8, 12, ?, 60
    9. 13, 18, 28, 45, 71, ?
    10. 7 ,  8,  18,  57,  232,  ?

Reading Comprehension:

First Shift:

Well, he set out, and he traveled a long way, and at last he came to a woman’s cottage that had some grass growing on the roof. And the woman was trying to get her cow to go up a ladder to the grass, and the poor thing durst not go. So the gentleman asked the woman what she was doing. “Why, lookye,” she said, “look at all that beautiful grass. I’m going to get the cow on to the roof to eat it. She’ll be quite safe, for I shall tie a string round her neck, and pass it down the chimney, and tie it to my wrist as I go about the house, so she can’t fall off without my knowing it.” “Oh, you poor silly!” said the gentleman, “you should cut the grass and throw it down to the cow!” But the woman thought it was easier to get the cow up the ladder than to get the grass down, so she pushed her and coaxed her and got her up, and tied a string round her neck, and passed it down the chimney, and fastened it to her own wrist. And the gentleman went on his way, but he hadn’t gone far when the cow tumbled off the roof, and hung by the string tied round her neck, and it strangled her. And the weight of the cow tied to her wrist pulled the woman up the chimney, and she stuck fast half-way and was smothered in the soot.

And the gentleman went on and on, and he went to an inn to stop the night, and they were so full at the inn that they had to put him in a double-bedded room, and another traveler was to sleep in the other bed. The other man was a very pleasant fellow, and they got very friendly together; but in the morning, when they were both getting up, the gentleman was surprised to see the other hang his trousers on the knobs of the chest of drawers and run across the room and try to jump into them, and he tried over and over again, and couldn’t manage it; and the gentleman wondered whatever he was doing it for. At last he stopped and wiped his face with his handkerchief. “Oh dear,” he says, “I do think trousers are the most awkwardest kind of clothes that ever were. I can’t think who could have invented such things. It takes me the best part of an hour to get into mine every morning, and I get so hot! How do you manage yours?” So the gentleman burst out a-laughing, and showed him how to put them on; and he was very much obliged to him, and said he never should have thought of doing it that way.

Then the gentleman went on his travels again; and he came to a village, and outside the village there was a pond, and round the pond was a crowd of people. And they had got rakes, and brooms, and pitchforks, reaching into the pond; and the gentleman asked what was the matter. “Why,” they say, “matter enough! Moon’s tumbled into the pond, and we can’t rake her out anyhow!” So the gentleman burst out a- laughing, and told them to look up into the sky, and that it was only the shadow in the water. But they wouldn’t listen to him, and abused him shamefully, and he got away as quick as he could.

So there was a whole lot of sillies bigger than them three sillies at home. So the gentleman turned back home again and married the farmer’s daughter, and if they didn’t live happy for ever after, that’s nothing to do with you or me.

Second Shift:

Once upon a time there was a boy whose name was Jack, and he lived with his mother on a common. They were very poor, and the old woman got her living by spinning, but Jack was so lazy that he would do nothing but bask in the sun in the hot weather, and sit by the corner of the hearth in the winter-time. So they called him Lazy Jack. His mother could not get him to do anything for her, and at last told him, one Monday, that if he did not begin to work for his porridge she would turn him out to get his living as he could.

This roused Jack, and he went out and hired himself for the next day to a neighbouring farmer for a penny; but as he was coming home, never having had any money before, he lost it in passing over a brook. “You stupid boy,” said his mother, “you should have put it in your pocket.” “I’ll do so another time,” replied Jack.

On Wednesday, Jack went out again and hired himself to a cow-keeper, who gave him a jar of milk for his day’s work. Jack took the jar and put it into the large pocket of his jacket, spilling it all, long before he got home. “Dear me!” said the old woman; “you should have carried it on your head.” “I’ll do so another time,” said Jack. So on Thursday, Jack hired himself again to a farmer, who agreed to give him a cream cheese for his services. In the evening Jack took the cheese, and went home with it on his head. By the time he got home the cheese was all spoilt, part of it being lost, and part matted with his hair. “You stupid lout,” said his mother, “you should have carried it very carefully in your hands.” “I’ll do so another time,” replied Jack.

On Friday, Lazy Jack again went out, and hired himself to a baker, who would give him nothing for his work but a large tom-cat. Jack took the cat, and began carrying it very carefully in his hands, but in a short time pussy scratched him so much that he was compelled to let it go. When he got home, his mother said to him, “You silly fellow, you should have tied it with a string, and dragged it along after you.” “I’ll do so another time,” said Jack. So on Saturday, Jack hired himself to a butcher, who rewarded him by the handsome present of a shoulder of mutton. Jack took the mutton, tied it to a string, and trailed it along after him in the dirt, so that by the time he had got home the meat was completely spoilt. His mother was this time quite out of patience with him, for the next day was Sunday, and she was obliged to make do with cabbage for her dinner. “You ninney-hammer,” said she to her son; “you should have carried it on your shoulder.” “I’ll do so another time,” replied Jack.

On the next Monday, Lazy Jack went once more, and hired himself to a cattle-keeper, who gave him a donkey for his trouble. Jack found it hard to hoist the donkey on his shoulders, but at last he did it, and began walking slowly home with his prize. Now it happened that in the course of his journey there lived a rich man with his only daughter, a beautiful girl, but deaf and dumb. Now she had never laughed in her life, and the doctors said she would never speak till somebody made her laugh. This young lady happened to be looking out of the window when Jack was passing with the donkey on his shoulders, with the legs sticking up in the air, and the sight was so comical and strange that she burst out into a great fit of laughter, and immediately recovered her speech and hearing. Her father was overjoyed, and fulfilled his promise by marrying her to Lazy Jack, who was thus made a rich gentleman. They lived in a large house, and Jack’s mother lived with them in great happiness until she died.

Cloze Test:

Education is the single most important instrument for social and economic transformation. A well educated population, adequately equipped with knowledge and skill is not only essential to support economic growth, but is also a pre-condition for growth to be inclusive since it is the educated and skilled people who stand to benefit most from the employment opportunities which growth provides.
India is one of the few countries in the world where the working age population will be far in excess of those dependent on them and as per the World Bank, this will continue for at least three decades till 2040. This has increasingly been recognized as a potential source of significant strength for the national economy, provided we are able to equip and continuously upgrade the skills of the population in the working age group.
If India wants to become a manufacturing-hub, given its requirement for employment generation to reap the demographic advantage; it must focus on skill development instead of present education system. Since, India’s education system has been skewed in favour of formal education focusing on academics; it has done well in services/tertiary sector. As this sector is the most important recipient of formally educated work-force. Manufacturing processes, on the other hand, does not require academic skills to that extent, for majority of work-force. As a result, the people employed in this sector are either uneducated or unskilled as low-end firms can’t afford college graduates; or they are over-educated and yet unskilled at the task required, in case of firms that can pay. The education required for manufacturing is very basic that enables a person to read and understand instructions and make basic calculations; while the skills actually required vary from painting, welding, polishing, assembling, packaging, and equipment handling, among others. Thus, a complete overhaul of the existing education system is required.

The art of wood carving is very old craft in India. Since time immemorial, man had started decorating his home
by using wood carving methods. They used to make dolls and toys for their children. Wood craft in India is a
common heritage and is found to exist across all parts of the country.
The traditional craftsmen used wood, stone, earth and colour for painting as raw materials. They skillfully
carved doors, door frames and brackets in palaces and temples. Images of Gods, Idols and Deities were also made of Wood. Sacred woods were used in such creations. The wood carvers had to retain strict austerity throughout the period they were occupied in the work. There was no restriction on the usage of colour and varnish.

We can see carved wooden symbols in the rural areas which reminds us of a tribal heritage.Wood craft is still being used for carving toys and dolls. The modern wood carving has touched a new height of sculpuresqueperfection. At maintain traditional local flavor at the same time.The religious product includes images of gods and legendary figures like Durga, Ganesha, etc. Some craftsmen carve a single piece of wood to form an object. These attempts are made for artistic demonstration. Some distinct forms and shapes of items of wood craft have come down from remote past and some innovative forms have been evolved maintaining the custom and simplicity.

In the past, these wood craft items such as toys, dolls, idols, etc. were meant for local market. There is a great
demand for these wooden products as decorative items. The mostly carry decorative value in modern society.Some wood artisans make wooden masks depicting customary religious sentiments.The tools used for Wood craft are mainly the carpenter’stools, carving chisels and the wood. The woods that they use are soft and are easily available.There are thousands of wood craftsmen making pieces of wood carved items of exceptional beauty.

Arithmetic:

  1. The Average weight of A, B and C is 26.  B is 1/3 of A and C is A+29. Find the weight of C?
  2. A and B together complete a work in  40/3 days and B can alone complete the work 6 days more than A. Find the work done by B alone.
  3. Area of a circle is 616 cm. whose diameter is equal to the radius of a semicircle. Find the perimeter of the semicircle.
  4. The time taken to travel 117 km downstream is 9 hrs and speed of the stream is 3/10 of the speed of a boat. Find the distance while going upstream in some hrs.
  5. 48 kg of a mixture having milk and water in the ratio of 3:1. Then how much water must be added to a mixture so that ratio become 9:5?
  6. A PERSON BUY A COMMODITY ON 30% DISCOUNT ON THE LABELLED PRICE . HE SOLD THE THE COMMODITY FOR RS 4860 GAINING 50% PROFIT ON ITS COST PRICE . FIND THE LABELLED PRICE OF THE COMMODITY
  7. A PERSON SPEND 1/3 OF INCOME ON FOOD. HE SPEND THE REST OF INCOME IN THE RATIO 4:1 ON BUYING CLOTHES AND BOOKS RESPECTIVELY. HE SPENT RS2400 ON THE BOOKS . FIND THE TOTAL INCOME OF MAN.
  8. A and B can do a piece of work in 221/2 days. B takes 24 days more than A. A can finish the whole work in?

Reasoning:

8 PERSONS L,M,N,O,W,X,Y,Z SITTING IN STRAIGHT LINE FACING NORTH . FIVE PERSONS SIT BETWEEN X AND Z. Z DOES NOT SIT AT ANY EXTREME END OF THE LINE . L SITS THIRD TO THE LEFT OF M AND THERE ARE MORE THAN 2 PERSONS BETWEEN M AND X . Z IS NOT THE IMMEDIATE NEIGHBOUR OF N.Y IS TO THE IMMEDIEATE RIGHT OF N . NEITHER Y NOR N IS THE IS NEIGHBOUR OF M

seven persons P,Q,R,S,T,U,V ATTEND SEMINAR ON THE SEVEN DAYS OF THE WEEK STARTING FROM MON TO SUNDAY. T ATTENDED THE SEMINAR BEFORE WEDNESDAY . THERE ARE THREE PERSONS ATTENDING SEMINAR BETWEEN T AND P. NEITHER Q NOR R ATTEND SEMINAR ON WEDNESDAY . R ATTEND SEMINAR IMMIDIEATELY BEFORE U. NO OF PERSONS ATTENDING SEMINAR BETWEEN S AND Q IS SAME AS PERSONS ATTENDING SEMINARS BETWEEN S AND U.

seven people P Q R S U T V WORK IN SEVEN DIFFERENT DAY FROM monday to sunday but not necessarily in this oder .T works before wednesday. there are three people between T and P.as many person between P and S same as S and Q.neither Q nor R work in wednesday. U works immediately before V.

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