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English Questions – Para-jumbled Paragraph for RRB Set 154

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Welcome to Online English Section with explanation in AffairsCloud.com. Here we are creating question sample in Para-jumbled paragraph , which is BASED ON IBPS PO/CLERK/LIC AAO/RRB & SSC CGL EXAM and other competitive exams !!!

Rearrange the following sentences in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph then answer the following questions.

A. Similarly, speaking anything more than the whole truth can also lead to dire consequences
B. Anyone called upon to give evidence in a court of law is required to take an oath “to speak the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth”
C. is seen in the circumstances that led to the killing of Guru Dronacharya in the Mahabharata
D. The oath is necessary because half-truths can be more misleading than the whole truth
E. A classic example of how truth can be misrepresented,

  1. Which would be the second sentence after Rearrangement?
    1.B
    2.A
    3.D
    4.C
    5.E
    Answer – 3.D

  2. Which would be the Fifth sentence after Rearrangement?
    1.D
    2.A
    3.E
    4.C
    5.B
    Answer – 4.C

  3. Which would be the First sentence after Rearrangement?
    1.E
    2.A
    3.C
    4.D
    5.B
    Answer – 5.B

  4. Which would be the Third sentence after Rearrangement?
    1.E
    2.B
    3.D
    4.A
    5.C
    Answer – 4.A

  5. Which would be Fourth sentence after Rearrangement?
    1.B
    2.D
    3.C
    4.A
    5.E
    Answer – 5.E

    II. Rearrange the following sentences in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph then answer the following questions.A. They argue that nuclear weapons have a deterrent effect which is the final assurance of their national security
    B. This new evidence about nuclear weapons has challenged the concept and utility of deterrence as a security doctrine
    C. The idea that nuclear weapons are important is not only held by North Korea to justify their nuclear weapons,
    but by all nuclear weapon states as an excuse to keep theirs
    D. Unfortunately, the concept of nuclear deterrence rests on outdated and dangerous logic
    E. In the last few years new studies and reports have revealed much more about the history and risks of nuclear weapons
  6. Which is the Fourth sentence after Rearrangement?
    1.E
    2.A
    3.C
    4.B
    5.D
    Answer – 1.E

  7. Which is the First sentence after Rearrangement?
    1.C
    2.A
    3.E
    4.B
    5.D
    Answer – 1.C

  8. Which is the Fifth sentence after Rearrangement?
    1.B
    2.A
    3.F
    4.E
    5.G
    Answer – 1.B

  9. Which is the Second sentence after Rearrangement?
    1.E
    2.A
    3.C
    4.B
    5.D
    Answer – 2.A

  10. Which is the Third sentence after Rearrangement?
    1.A
    2.B
    3.D
    4.E
    5.C
    Answer – 3.D

    Correct Sequence – 1
    A. Anyone called upon to give evidence in a court of law is required to take an oath “to speak the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth”
    B. The oath is necessary because half-truths can be more misleading than the whole truth
    C. Similarly, speaking anything more than the whole truth can also lead to dire consequences
    D. A classic example of how truth can be misrepresented,
    E. is seen in the circumstances that led to the killing of Guru Dronacharya in the Mahabharata

    Correct Sequence – 2
    A. The idea that nuclear weapons are important is not only held by North Korea to justify their nuclear weapons,
    but by all nuclear weapon states as an excuse to keep theirs
    B. They argue that nuclear weapons have a deterrent effect which is the final assurance of their national security
    C. Unfortunately, the concept of nuclear deterrence rests on outdated and dangerous logic
    D. In the last few years new studies and reports have revealed much more about the history and risks of nuclear weapons
    E. This new evidence about nuclear weapons has challenged the concept and utility of deterrence as a security doctrine